Book Review: “Bad Blood” by John Carreyrou

In September 2015, Elizabeth Holmes–the CEO of the now-defunct biotech unicorn Theranos–pleaded with Rupert Mudoch to kill a damning story The Wall Street Journal’s John Carreyrou was about to break on one of the most elaborate smoke-and-mirrors acts in Silicon Valley. Mudoch, the owner of the paper, happened to be Theranos’ biggest investor. Bought into… Continue reading Book Review: “Bad Blood” by John Carreyrou

Book Review: “Big Data Baseball” by Travis Sawchick

In Big Data Baseball, award-winning sports journalist Travis Sawchick dissects the sabermetric revolution in America’s favorite pastime through the lens of the 2013 Pittsburgh Pirates’ unexpected run to the playoffs. The Pirates, who were the laughing stock of steel city after twenty consecutive sub-.500 seasons, snapped the longest losing streak in the history of North… Continue reading Book Review: “Big Data Baseball” by Travis Sawchick

Book Review: “Participation in Congress” by Richard Hall

In his book Participation in Congress, Richard Hall offers a cogent analysis of House of Representatives members’ formal and informal congressional participation. In formal committee and subcommittee markup sessions, members collectively consider the central issues of a bill; debate specific provisions and counterproposals; and summarize, amend, and vote on the legislation. Informal decision-making activity, which… Continue reading Book Review: “Participation in Congress” by Richard Hall

Book Review: “The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality” by Angus Deaton

Angus Deaton’s book The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality is an upbeat assessment of global progress from prehistory to modern times. Deaton, a Princeton University economist who won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 2015, ambitiously traces the history of wealth and health around the world in a data-backed account… Continue reading Book Review: “The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality” by Angus Deaton

Book Review: “Game of our Lives” by David Goldblatt

In his book The Game of Our Lives, David Goldblatt expertly captures the sweeping economic, political, and social changes of British society in the post-Thatcher era through his analysis of football. The sheer scale of football and its central place in British cultural life renders the sport a ripe medium for exploring Britain’s changing character.… Continue reading Book Review: “Game of our Lives” by David Goldblatt

Book Review: “The Russian Intelligentsia” by Andrei Sinyavsky

Members of the Russian intelligentsia succumbed to the seduction of power according to Andrei Sinyavsky, who was unrelenting in denouncing them for it in his book The Russian Intelligentsia. In his scathing critique of the intelligentsia, Sinyavsky condemns the group for its excessive lust for power, unwarranted sycophantic affection toward the Yeltsin administration, and increasingly… Continue reading Book Review: “The Russian Intelligentsia” by Andrei Sinyavsky

Book Review: “Happiness is a Serious Problem: A Human Nature Repair Manual” by Dennis Prager

In Happiness is a Serious Problem: A Human Nature Repair Manual, Dennis Prager teaches us how to overcome the numerous daunting obstacles to the nearly universal goal of happiness. His book is organized into 31 chapters that individually, are self-contained units with tremendous didactic value and collectively, function as a practical guide to living a… Continue reading Book Review: “Happiness is a Serious Problem: A Human Nature Repair Manual” by Dennis Prager

Book Review: “Thinking, Fast and Slow” by Daniel Kahneman

In his best-selling book Thinking, Fast and Slow, Daniel Kahneman challenges the assumption that human beings are rational actors. Kahneman, a cognitive psychologist who won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 2002, presents a compelling collection of findings that illustrate humans’ susceptibility to the pitfalls of intuition. He organizes his discussion about human error… Continue reading Book Review: “Thinking, Fast and Slow” by Daniel Kahneman

Book Review: “The Innovator’s Dilemma” by Clayton Christensen

Below is my review of “The Innovator’s Dilemma” by Clayton Christensen. Thank you, Professor Green, for recommending this book to your students as an optional read. I’m glad I got around to reading it! In 2011, Forbes aptly called world famous Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen “one of the most influential business theorists of the… Continue reading Book Review: “The Innovator’s Dilemma” by Clayton Christensen

Book Review: “Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora” by Stephanie Smallwood

In Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora, Stephanie E. Smallwood traces the trajectory of slaves from Africa to the Americas between 1675 and 1725. Smallwood’s work, which focuses specifically on the British slave trade from the Gold Coast, offers an insightful look into the processes of commodification and forced migration undergone… Continue reading Book Review: “Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora” by Stephanie Smallwood